Bar Wars: A New Recipe

Hello world,

Many apologies for my recent absinthe (bahahaha). I got caught up with life, and sadly, life did not involve too much mixologizing.

HOWEVER! That doesn’t mean there weren’t any ideas sloshing around in my head.  In an event that I had to coordinate in the past few weeks, I took it upon myself to create a classy little number.

This upstanding group of young professionals that I wanted to impress deserved something  more than just a re-hashed “coke and rum” shenanigan. They needed a sophisticated beverage. Something dynamic that could be nursed… or chugged. Something that induced ample salivation… yet impressed members of the opposite sex.

Behold! I give you… a treasure…

A Known Pleasure

1.5 oz Bacardi Gold Rum

.75 oz Disaronno Amaretto

Fill Club Soda

Instructions: Build in a highball full of ice.

General Notes:

This is a great, yet simple drink. Caramel notes from the gold rum compliment the amaretto fairly well. I’m still thinking of an appropriate garnish… but the base works wonderfully! Whiskey acts as a comparable substitute if you’re into that kind of thing. A blended whiskey, preferably.

Next time, I give you two sexy cocktails. That’s right. Two. Deuce. Dos. A pair. More than one and less than three. I’ll shut up now.

J Lo, out.

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A Glass of Class: Not For Kids Under 21

Candy Crasher

1 generous handful of Warheads candies (make sure they’re all the same flavor)

3 shots Bacardi 151

2 scoops of ice

Blend the ingredients together, liquefying the ice and candies.

So, Calvin and I came into possession of a massive bag of candy this past week. As a testament to just how much willpower we have, we didn’t end up eating ourselves into diabetic blindness. However, this meant a good amount of candy was left in the bag by Friday. Neither of us wanted it taking up space, but we couldn’t waste such a glorious testament to how childish we are. So, I threw some Warheads (my favorite) into a blender, added some Bacardi and ice, and just let the bastard grind for a bit. What emerged was a frothy green abomination, challenging our sensibilities. It was an absurd collision of childhood and adulthood, gurgling in the highball; I’m almost certain I faintly heard it say “kill me.” We were less than enthusiastic about tasting what looked like a bad idea, but I manned up and decided to dignify my creation with a sip. I sloshed it around, looked into the glass, and took another; the drink’s tangy-sweet mix had just enough of a bite from the rum to make it taste right. We were astounded that such a stupid idea turned out well, but it looks like it did. Not only does it taste good, it’s a great talking point at parties when people ask just what the hell it is. I recommend, if you choose to embark on this trip into absurdity, that you experiment with it, though (especially with how it looks. Try to make it less…vomity.)

–The sweet and sour C & L

Midnight Wine Talks #3: Chianti Superiore

Today we tried a Banfi wine, the namesake of our school’s hotel’s restaurant.

Varietal: Chianti

Vintage: 2009
Origin: Tuscany, Italy
ABV: 13%
Price: ~$10

Winemaker’s notes: “Fresh and fruity hints on the nose, well integrated in a round structure and full body.  The lively acidity is well balanced with the rest of the structure. Ready to drink, pleasant and persistent. [It]… is pleasingly smooth and satisfying with its clean and distinctive flavours… Ideal with grilled meat dishes, poultry or pasta.”

Our notes:

Sunnie: I would say it’s very medium body, light on the tannins, and there’s a strong aftertaste.

Audrey: What varietal is this?

Sunnie: I think it’s just Chianti.

Audrey: Definitely not as familiar with that name as ones like Cabernet, or Pinot.

Sunnie: Time for some internet research… They age it for 4-5 months in a French oak barrel and after, another 4-5 months in the bottle. It is 75% of the Sangiovese varietal.

Audrey: I didn’t know Banfi’s makes this kind of wine. I’m really enjoying this Da Vinci painting on the bottle. This is very easy to drink… it’s almost sugar-y sweet and the aftertaste is not too strong or bitter.

Sunnie: Wines with Sangiovese grapes usually taste of ripe black fruits, like black cherries or plums. It’s usually used as a ‘blender’ varietal that’s added on to the local varietal. By itself, Sangiovese is usually too harsh and acidic. It’s the most-planted red varietal in Italy.

Audrey: Very cool, I can definitely taste the black fruits. It’s more fruity than floral.

Sunnie: Why is it so cheap? I don’t understand… it’s cheap and affordable, so great! Hm… I can definitely taste black cherry.

A Glass of Class: Gin and Bear It

Gin and Bear It

2 shots U.V. vodka or Blue Curacao (the latter if you like sweeter drinks)

2 shots gin

1/2 a glass of cola

Mix it all together.

Even drunk Lucio can make delicious concotions, ladies and gents. At a recent friend-of-a-friend’s house party, I got my hands on some U.V. It was my first of many adventures i plan on having with that tangy, delicious liquor. Blueberry usually doesn’t agree with me, too, but for some reason, this stuff was just perfectly balanced between sweet and sour to keep the berry sugar from overtaking the taste. I had, in my hazy inebriation, the great idea to mix it in with some cola we had on the drinks table. Before I could taste it, though, somebody poured me a shot of gin. With rapier wit (just kidding,) I convinced my cohorts to let me just add the shot to my drink. I feared the worst, cringing at the thought of having wasted the drink. However, some magical chemistry shit had occurred in that sloshing Solo cup: the drink tasted fresh and tangy without taking on the usual sweetness-enhancing properties gin tends to have. Needless to say, the drink was immediately filed under “THINGS TO REMEMBER TOMORROW MORNING.”

A side note: I added to the recipe a possible substitute for UV with Blue Curacao, in case tang doesn’t sit well in your tastes; be warned, however, that I haven’t tested this mix, and it could be (and probably is) ridiculously sweet.

–C and L